COSMIC DISTURBANCE

Marte Eknæs, Bertrand Flanet, Marcus Kleinfeld, Benja Sachau, Timo Seber.
An exhibition curated by Nelly Gawellek

17 October – 14 November 2015

Vernissage: Friday, 16 October 2015, 6 – 9 pm

cosmic_hp_850

 

Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015
Installation view, SCHMIDT & HANDRUP Cologne, 2015

 
 

COSMIC  DISTURBANCE
 
Marte Eknæs, Bertrand Flanet, Marcus Kleinfeld, Benja Sachau, Timo Seber
curated by Nelly Gawellek

 

 

Lloyd: „Yes, this machine is frightening people, but it’s made by people.“
Don: „…and people aren’t frightening?“
Lloyd: „It’s not that. It’s more of a cosmic disturbance. This machine’s intimidating because it contains infinite quantities of information and that’s threatening because human existence is finite. But isn’t it godlike, that we mastered the infinite? The IBM 360 can count more stars in a day, than we can count in a lifetime.“
Don: „But what man lay on his back counting stars and thought about a number?“
 
In one of the episodes of the TV series „Mad Men“ protagonist Don Draper, creative director of an advertising agency in New York in the 1950s and 60s, talks to computer specialist Lloyd who supervises the installation of the first computer in the agency, the new IBM 360.
Taking place in 1969, one year after Stanley Kubrick’s „2001: A Space Odyssey” premiered and Lance Armstrong was the first man to set foot on the moon, this fictional dialogue is an example for the unease new technologies create. It depicts the ongoing tug-of-war of man versus machine which still prevails and is even more pressing now that yesterday’s utopia came true and digital technologies took over. Stock markets react automatically within fractions of a second to price or currency fluctuations (High Frequency Trading), drones are able to hear and see quicker than human ears or eyes, and people are connected to devices that navigate our ways through the digital and the real world – if there is still a difference at all. The feeling of a „cosmic disturbance“ seems very contemporary. However, with capitalism sprawling into every corner of our lives, it seems that the conflict has shifted from „man versus machine“ to „man versus market“. The mechanisms are the same: human mind creates a system or structure, which grows to take on a life of its own and supersedes its creator. Is there a way out of the dilemma?
 
Instead of fighting this system/structure accelerationist theories and posthuman philosophy try to regain control by adopting it and use its own tools in order to create a new future from within the system. As an example: Within the common structure of past, present and future, the narrative is constantly disrupted as everything is in flux. To escape this dilemma the concept of „Platonia“ is introduced as a timeless realm unfolding in infinite possibilities, where the future we are waiting for does actually exist as a present potential. Although appearing esoteric this theory is already in practice within the financial system, for example in derivative trade. The future is just what the majority believes in.
 
Does this mean that utopia is just around the corner? Apparently it’s not that simple. The only way to overcome the overall encompassing mechanisms of neo-liberal economy is to provoke a collapse from within the system. Thus, its agents – media, technology, even politics are liberated and can unfold their original potential.
This aim can only be reached via speculation and experiment – science fiction or pop culture propose new narratives – but it also seems that art has embraced this telos and in a very confident manner practices ways to undermine and deconstruct established mechanisms, by superimposing, mocking, or rehashing contemporary narratives of current ideologies.
 
Marte Eknæs:
The exhibition shows a group of works dealing with the complex relationship between architecture and design as ways of creating our environment and optimization processes introduced by economical or industrial practice. Architecture and design have always influenced our visions of the future and vice versa. The physical space around us is interspersed with past and present ideologies, hierarchies and beliefs. Architecture and design, and also art, give shape to new concepts, but they tend to be commodified and fetishized.
Obviously today’s agenda is optimization: from machines, work flows, supply chains to our body. Our environment and the products we use are designed to make everything run smoothly. Ambitious architecture projects aim to create highly specialized environments connecting and bring to tune different needs. In her project „The Zaha Hadid Waterfront Waterpark“ Eknæs transforms Hadid’s futuristic mega-design into an alternative model using everyday objects, that seem strange, often silly, being used out of their original context. Demistifying the original building, Marte Eknæs raises critical questions about the processes promoted by the market economy and favors for a different approach to rediscover the utopian potential of the material.
 
Betrand Flanet:
Are there still men „laying on their back counting the stars“ as Don Draper wishes for? Bertrand Flanets work „Index Case Whatever“ is quite pessimistic and draws a scenario in which some kind of corporate higher being has taken over. We are no longer dealing with people or political parties, but with abstract subordinate beings, or networks, who, fed by data, follow complex algorithms. We are aware that they seduce us to make their profits but it seems we got used to it and enjoy the advantages more than we fear the consequences. However this condition is not static, instead maybe there is more to know than we can say with our words – yet.
 
Marcus Kleinfeld:
With recent achievements in the field of nano- or biotechnologies, transhumanist theories find humankind entering the next stage of evolution. Critics of these theories however see them as pronouncing neoliberal tendencies, which propagate the ultimate optimization of the human body. In his work „Audit“ Marcus Kleinfeld uses a TV device to broadcast messages taken from the Scientology practice of „Auditing“. This procedure is one of the central techniques to achieve the state of „Clear“, which is the condition in which the believer has overcome all his flaws. How far does our desire for perfection go? And perhaps more important: Where does it come from?
 
Timo Seber:
Philosophy and cultural theory since Schiller have acknowledged the utopian potential of playing. It is a trial and error of future structures. In a future that is not mere physical and where playing takes place in a virtual sphere this potential is suspended. The digital seems to make everything possible we can imagine, with bypassing any physical restrictions and without implying boundaries such as gender, race or physical constitution of the player. Maybe it’s time we take the game seriously.
 
Benja Sachau:
The works shown deal with different conspiracy theories, from Hale Bopp to the theory of „The Elite Network“, trying to prove that the world is governed by reptiles from a fourth dimension a.k.a. Angela Merkel or Barack Obama. Human urge for finding some kind of truth sometimes leads to absurd narratives. But what else but man-made narratives are the ideologies that shape our society. Is it only idle or just pointless to create new utopia, which will eventually turn into new ideologies? The truth is hard or even impossible to find, but it seems impossible for us to stop looking.
 
Text: Nelly Gawellek

 


COSMIC DISTURBANCE
 
Marte Eknæs, Bertrand Flanet, Marcus Kleinfeld, Benja Sachau, Timo Seber
kuratiert von Nelly Gawellek
 
Lloyd: „Yes, this machine is frightening people, but it’s made by people.“
Don: „…and people aren’t frightening?“
Lloyd: „It’s not that. It’s more of a cosmic disturbance. This machine’s intimidating because it contains infinite quantities of information and that’s threatening because human existence is finite. But isn’t it godlike, that we mastered the infinite? The IBM 360 can count more stars in a day, than we can count in a lifetime.“
Don: „But what man lay on his back counting stars and thought about a number?“
 
Der oben zitierte Dialog stammt aus der TV-Serie „Mad Men“ und spielt sich zwischen Don Draper, dem Kreativdirektor einer New Yorker Werbeagentur der 1950er und 60er Jahre und dem Computerspezialisten Lloyd ab, der die Einrichtung des ersten Computers in der Agentur vornimmt. Es ist das Jahr 1969, ein Jahr zuvor erschien Stanley Kubricks: „2001: A Space Odyssee“ und Lance Armstrong landete als erster Mensch auf dem Mond. Das fiktive Gespräch zwischen Lloyd und Don steht exemplarisch für eine Unruhe, die durch neue technologische Errungenschaften hervorgerufen wird und beschreibt eine weiter Szene, in der nicht enden wollenden Auseinandersetzung zwischen Mensch und Maschine, die sich heute, in einer Zeit, in der die einstigen Utopien Wirklichkeit geworden und digitale Technologien sämtliche Bereiche des täglichen Lebens erobert haben, erneut aufdrängt. Aktienmärkte reagieren innerhalb von Bruchteilen von Sekunden auf kleinste Veränderungen des Marktes (High Frequency Trading), Drohnen hören und sehen schneller als menschliche Augen und Ohren, und der Mensch ist an technische Geräte angeschlossen, die ihm den Weg durch die reale und die digitale Welt weisen – sofern es überhaupt noch einen Unterschied zwischen den beiden Sphären gibt. „Cosmic Disturbance“, das Gefühl einer kosmischen oder urgewaltigen Unruhe erscheint sehr aktuell. Mit dem Kapitalismus als übergreifendem System, das jede Sphäre des Alltags beeinflusst, scheint es jedoch als hätte sich die Auseinandersetzung verschoben, von „Mensch gegen Maschine“, hin zu „Mensch gegen Markt“. Die Mechanismen sind dieselben: Der Mensch erschafft ein System oder eine Struktur, die selbstständig wird und ihren Schöpfer überflüssig macht. Gibt es einen Weg, der uns aus diesem Dilemma herausführt?
 
Anstatt das System/die Struktur zu bekämpfen, sehen akzelerationistische und posthumanistische Theorien die Lösung, in einer Adaption des Systems. Sie wollen die Kontrolle wiedergewinnen, indem sie es mit seinen eigenen Waffen schlagen und von innen heraus neue Utopien entwickeln. Ein Beispiel: Innerhalb der herkömmlichen zeitlichen Struktur von Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft wird die Erzählung ständig durch unvorhergesehene Zwischenfälle unterbrochen, da alle Abläufe in ständiger Veränderung und Bewegung begriffen sind. Um diesem Dilemma zu entkommen, wurde das Konzept „Platonia“ entwickelt. Es handelt sich hierbei um ein Verständnis von Zeit als einem Raum der Möglichkeiten, innerhalb dessen die Zukunft als Potential der Gegenwart bereits existiert. Diese Theorie mag zunächst esoterisch erscheinen, wird jedoch bereits in der Praxis genutzt, zum Beispiel im Derivatehandel. Die Zukunft ist also meist genau das, woran die Mehrheit glaubt.
 
Heißt das, dass die Utopie, nach der wir streben, bereits existiert und wir nur noch nach ihr greifen müssen? Anscheinend ist es nicht ganz so einfach. Der einzige Weg, die allumfassenden Mechanismen einer neoliberalen Gesellschaftsordnung zu überwinden ist, das System zum Kollabieren zu bringen, um seine Agenten – Medien, Technologie, auch die Politik, zu befreien, um ihr volles Potential frei zu setzen.
Dieses Ziel, so der Akzelerationismus, kann nur durch die Spekulation und das Experiment erreicht werden – Science Fiction und Popkultur entwerfen neue Erzählungen und Visionen für die Zukunft – aber auch die Kunst scheint dieses Telos verinnerlicht zu haben und erprobt auf souveräne Art und Weise Möglichkeiten, etablierte Mechanismen zu unterwandern und auszuhebeln.
 
Marte Eknæs:
Die Ausstellung zeigt eine Gruppe von Arbeiten, die sich mit dem komplexen Verhältnis von Architektur und Design als Möglichkeiten der Gestaltung von Umwelt und den Optimierungsprozessen, die durch die ökonomische und industrielle Praxis eingeführt wurden, beschäftigt. Architektur und Design haben schon seit je her unsere Vorstellung von der Zukunft geprägt und mitgestaltet. Der physikalische Raum um uns ist durchdrungen von vergangenen und gegenwärtigen Ideologien, Hierarchien und Weltbildern. Architektur und Design, aber auch Kunst geben Konzepten eine Form, werden jedoch auch schnell zu begehrten Waren. Im heutigen Design, geht es offensichtlich darum, Prozesse zu optimieren, seien es Maschinen, Arbeitsabläufe oder sogar der menschliche Körper. Ehrgeizige Architekturprojekte versuchen unsere Umwelt so zu gestalten, dass Abläufe perfekt aufeinander abgestimmt sind. Eknæs’ Projekt „The Zaha Hadid Waterfront Waterpark“ verwandelt Hadids futuristisches Mega-Design in ein alternatives Modell: Seltsame, außerhalb ihres eigentlichen Kontexts merkwürdig und albern wirkende Objekte, wie Fahrradhelme oder Nackenkissen, entmystifizieren das eigentliche Gebäude, stellen Fragen nach Prozessen und Standards, die durch die Industrie und den Markt gefordert werden und fordern einen alternativen Zugang zum Material, das dessen utopisches Potential wiederentdeckt.
 
Bertrand Flanet:
Gibt es ihn noch, den Menschen, der auf dem Rücken liegend die Sterne zählt, so wie Don Draper es sich wünscht? Bertrand Flanets Video-Arbeit „Index Case Whatever“ ist eher pessimistisch und zeichnet ein Szenario, in dem eine „höhere Macht“ die Kontrolle übernommen hat. Wir haben es nicht mehr länger mit Menschen oder politischen Parteien zu tun, sondern mit höheren Wesen, die, organisiert in Netzwerken, gefüttert mit Daten, komplexen Algorithmen folgen. Wir sind uns wohl bewusst, dass wir verführt werden, aber es scheint, als hätten wir uns bereits daran gewöhnt und würden uns eher der Vorteile erfreuen, als uns um die Konsequenzen zu sorgen. Dennoch: Der Zustand ist nicht statisch und möglicherweise ahnen wir vielleicht sogar schon mehr, als wir mit unseren Worten beschreiben können.
 
Marcus Kleinfeld:
Transhumanistische Theorien sehen den Menschen in einem neuen evolutionären Stadium, in dem der menschliche Körper mithilfe von Nano- oder Biotechnologien eine neue Entwicklungsstufe erreicht. Kritiker sehen in dieser Theorie die Ausprägung neoliberaler Tendenzen, die auf die größtmögliche Optimierung des Menschen abzielt. In seiner Arbeit „Audit“ sendet Marcus Kleinfeld über einen Fernsehapparat Botschaften, die der durch die religiöse Vereinigung Scientology praktizierten Technik des Auditing entnommen wurden und dem Gläubigen dabei helfen sollen, das Stadium des „Clear“ zu erreichen, das einen Zustand beschreibt, in dem der Gläubige all seine Mängel und Fehler überwunden hat. Wie weit geht unser Verlangen nach Selbstoptimierung? Oder vielleicht sollten wir uns besser fragen: Woher kommt es?
 
Timo Seber:
Das utopische Potential des Spiels wird seit Schiller von der Philosophie und Kulturwissenschaft als ein naives Erproben von Zukunft beschrieben. In einer Zukunft, die nicht mehr nur in einer physisch erfahrbaren Umwelt, sondern in einem virtuellen Raum stattfindet, ist dieses utopische Potential scheinbar unendlich erweitert. Der virtuelle Raum bietet unbegrenzte Möglichkeiten, indem er die Hindernisse des physikalischen Raums, und mögliche Hürden, wie Geschlecht, Herkunft oder körperliche Handicaps überwindet. Womöglich ist es an der Zeit, dass wir das Spiel ernst nehmen.
 
Benja Sachau:
Die in der Ausstellung gezeigten Arbeiten beschäftigen sich mit Verschwörungstheorien, von Hale Bopp bis zu der Theorie von einem „Elite Network“, die versucht, zu beweisen, dass die Welt von Reptilien aus der vierten Dimension, in Person von Angela Merkel oder Barack Obama, beherrscht wird. Das menschliche Verlangen, die ultimative Wahrheit zu finden führt teilweise zu absurden Erklärungen. Was aber sind die Geschichten und Mythen, die wir uns erzählen und die unsere Gesellschaft formen? Ist es schlicht überheblich oder einfach nur sinnlos neue Utopien zu entwerfen, die sich am Ende nur als weitere Ideologien entpuppen? Die Wahrheit ist unmöglich auszumachen, aber es scheint uns unmöglich zu sein, nicht nach ihr zu suchen.
 
Text: Nelly Gawellek